culture of compassion, Leadership, wellbeing

Put your energy in the right place – how to get more love in the workplace – part 5

I had a revelation this week; one of those Aha! moments that come along very infrequently but when they do they make a significant difference. It was about energy and the need to put your energy in the right place to increase your work productivity and sense of well-being.

It emerged during a coaching session when I was thinking about how to more effectively lead the programme that I am currently directing. What became clear was that as the programme is in the start-up stage and does not have a full team in place, my energy has been spent in the mechanics of the programme, administrating and being ‘in the weeds’ of the day to day rather than strategising and thinking through the policy implications.

My preference is for global (strategic) thinking, which is right brain dominant and leads to a focus on the future state; the big picture and people with this preference thrive on experimenting and spend time ‘thinking’ rather than ‘doing.’ This means that when I put my energy into detail; reactive activities and short term tasks, it results in a drain in my energy.

I had convinced myself that I was getting to the end of the week exhausted and lacklustre due to the fact I had been spending all of my time on intellectually challenging activities; however when I really thought about it and closely examined how I spend my time during the week it became clear that the majority of my time is spent in meetings and working on the mechanics of setting up the programme leaving only a small amount of time left for thinking and working on strategy and policy development.

This has started me thinking about energy and how to use it more wisely to be more productive in the workplace by focusing it in the right places. A further look into some tools and techniques for how to do this best revealed a really informative Harvard Business Review article about ‘how to manage your energy not your time.’ The article identifies that energy is defined in physics as the capacity to work, and comes from four main wellsprings in human beings: the body, emotions, mind, and spirit. It suggests that it is possible to systematically expand and regularly renew energy through specific rituals, which are described as behaviours that are intentionally practiced and intentionally practices so as to become unconscious thinking.

This article summed it up for me: “To access the energy of the human spirit, people need to clarify priorities and establish accompanying rituals in three categories: doing what they do best and enjoy most at work; consciously allocating time and energy to the areas of their lives—work, family, health, service to others—they deem most important; and living their core values in their daily behaviors.” Take their test to see if you are heading for an energy crisis and for top tips on how to prevent it.

My revelation has made me think more widely about the fact that, despite having the highest staff engagement scores in the country, my organisation is in the worst 20% of Trusts scoring that staff are working long hours and we are noticing that for the first time stress due to workload is on the rise. Finding the approaches that are going to make the difference in busy, healthcare environments is very difficult. Working on helping staff to manage their energy may be the completely different approach we might need to consider.

Over the next few months I’m going to be trying out some of the new techniques coupled with applying the learning from Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People (more on this in a future blog) to see if I can change my energy balance; be more productive and fulfilled and hopefully make more quality time for my team and colleagues.

Resources used:

Identify the difference between strategic and global thinking http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/are-you-a-linear-or-global-thinker

Test whether you have a strategic or a linear thinking preference http://www.harvardbusiness.org/blog/are-you-strategic-thinker-test-yourself

 Full article from Schwartz and McCarthy; 2007; Manage your energy not your time; Harvard Business Review https://hbr.org/2007/10/manage-your-energy-not-your-time

Covey; Stephen R; The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People; Rosetta; 1989 

About the author

Sarah Morgan is the Director of Organisational Development and the Vanguard Foundation Healthcare Group Programme Director for Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

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